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will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at oilspillcommission.gov. we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
this morning is what is america's core competency in your mind. if you would like to tell us how that can be nurtured by our leaders, we would like to hear that as well where we are going to get to your calls right away if we can get our producers to get some calls on the line while we are talking to you about america's core competency. we went to wikipedia which, as you know, is the self edited by people all rumble world really -- all are around the world really. we want to give you some statistics about the united states for its land mass. over 3.79 million square miles. 300 million people. the united states is the third or fourth largest country by a total area and the third largest both by land area of population. it is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multi- cultural nations, the product of a large-scale immigration from many countries. the u.s. economy is the world's largest national gdp of $14.30 trillion and a quarter of the nominal global gdp and one-fifth of the gdp at purchasing power parity. that is the size and the economics of the united states. one of the poss
of manhattan and brooklyn and you can see pictures of this in front of us. into this toxic crowd ran firefighters and police and other first responders. first responders came from all 50 states to aid in the rescue and cleanup of the subsequent days. the environmental protection administration, e.p.a., despite ample evidence to the contrary kept falsely proclaiming that the air was safe to breathe. it wasn't. the terrorists caused environmental catastrophe but the federal government compounded the damage by telling people the environment was safe when it wasn't and now thousands of people are sick and in need of special care. we have a moral obligation to treat those who became ill and that's what this bill is all about. for eight years representative maloney and i supported a bipartisan basis by the new york delegation and others have worked to bring this bill to the floor. now it is finally time to pass it. time and again, as we move this bill through the legislative process, we've adjusted it, reduced its size and scope, limited its cost and made concessions to broaden the coaliti
on for a time frame, even though the dispersant used was pre authorized, the issue that seemed to be elevated to a national response team in washington at some point, a decision was made that the epa should play a more active role, then call for. on may 20, and you advised bp to reduce the application of dispersant and provide the availability of less toxic dispersants. please help us understand your concerns and the process you went through in conjunction with the other federal agencies. the epa had more of a commanding role than anticipated than in the area contingency plan. is there some recommendation you can provide to us about what kind of guideline that we might recommend that would elevate the decision making to more routine decisions of these dispersants to these extraordinary kinds of decisions? >> thanks. i will probably end where you ended. there is a need for those kinds of guidelines. every day you make the decisions that are before you. over time, one of the things i discussed often is duke are not only looking at the decision before you that today, but also at the response. fr
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
bill: on the radio with brian. martha: we are brian's friends. come and listen to us there. "happening now" starts right now. jon: a tpaobgs news alert, we are waiting for a major announcement by thad allen regarding the bp spill in the gulf of mexico. we know they are close to completing one of the relief wells in the gulf. we are monitoring a news conference that is about toeubg place. as soon as there are any remarks we will bring you the break news as we get it. jenna: we are expecting the white house to react any moment to the latest and last round of major primaries before the november midterms. i'm jenna lee. some of our guests include senator jim demint, the senator of alaska, and of course karl rove. jon: robert gibbs expected to take the podium soon. the stunning strength of the tea party the talk of washington. christine o'donnell beats out michael castle, the long-term congressman and former governor. today she is saying she will win in november with or without the help of the republican establishment. molly line is live in boston for us, big surprise in delawar
. this is what you do. you get a cross-section. you use certain techniques. thes is no different than surveys in terms of methodologies that the surveys you read all of the time. if it is our true that our survey does not represent the pulte -- the population, then a new survey does either. regarding the question about civil unions, i think that is a very interesting question. many people say i am opposed to marriage. that conveys and means something different. there is a difference between marriage and a civil union. one difference is a very simple one. if you are married, you are in a different tax rate because you are a married couple. if you are in a civil union you are not. ironically, in many cases not being married is a financially beneficial. ironically, by not allowing same-sex couples to get married we are not getting the same taxes from them that we would get. about the 2% vs. the 98%, it has never been a question of what is the largest percentage of people and just benefiting them. the united states has always been concerned about both those with power and those without power. we
's clear that many of us, an many in our audience are just coming off of summer vacation. yesterday at the state department, felt a little bit like the first day of school. everyone showed up for our morning meeting, and looking a lot healthier than they did when they left. and it is also obvious that there isn't any rest for any of us. the events of the past few weeks have kept us busy. we are working to support direct talks between the israelis and the palestinians, and nexteek, i will travel to egypt and jerusalem for the second round of these negotiations. in iraq, where our combat mission has ended, we are transferring and transitioning to an unprecedented civilian-led partnership. we are stepping up international pressure on iran to negotiate seriously on its nuclear program. we are working with pakistan as it recovers from devastating floods and continues to combat violent extremism an of course, the war in afghanistan is always at the top of our minds as well as our agenda. now, none of these challenges exist in ice lags. -- isolation. consider the middle east peace talks. a
third parties and subsequently use in your operations? >> we've put in a full array of testing. we're taking samples from every incoming load. we've talked to all of our vendors for them also to do testing. we're doing a composite on these loads weekly and send them in for testing. we're going to do a monthly swabbing of our feed mill. we are currently in the process of completely cleaning and disinfecting the entire mill from top to bottom. and we've done extensive employee training to make sure that the mill is kept tightened up so that there's no open hatches as noted in the 483. >> what steps do you take to ensure that those planned or announced safeguards are implemented? >> we have a daily inspection by the mill manager. then we have an outside supervisor who is going to inspect the facilities once a week and give me a full report. >> do you still have your hog operations? >> we own some hog facilities but we don't own any -- we don't operate hog facilities. we just lease them. >> i see. mr. chairman, i note with some distress my time is up, and i thank you for your courtesy.
control right there on park avenue. thanks so much for being with us. man, a lot of news today. glad we're able to get you through it. look for it again tomorrow and tonight at 8:00 pl on t.m. on t primetime edition of "rick's list." hope to see you there. now wolf blitzer. >> workers forced overboard off an oil rig and forcing new pollution fears in the gulf of mexico. >>> also, warnings stretching from north carolina to new england to canada as a massive storm bears down on the east coast. we'll get the latest from the director of the national hurricane center. he's standing by live. and russia's military is blowing up tanks and missile launchers with a lot of air. we'll show you what's behind this secret inflatable arsenal. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with the breaking news. an oil and gas production platform caught fire in the gulf of mexico today about 100 miles off the coast of louisiana. mariner energy, the company that owns the platform, says the fire began at one of seven active wells connected to the rig. 13 workers were forced overboard, but
, a look at the u.s. foster care system. daniel heimpel joins us. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] host: good morning, and welcome to "washington journal" for wednesday, september 27, 2010. president obama travels to new york for the u.n. general assembly. he will talk health care reform at a back yard reception in virginia s and meet with insurance commissioners and this evening, a democratic fund- raiser. the house returns to washington for a few days of business and the senate continues work. yesterday it did not move for the defense authorization bill and overturning "don't ask, don't tell." a ban on gays openly serving in the military. top story today, a new book by bob woodward about inside the white house. but with the president and his top military advisers and recounts a tough decision on whether to build up true spirit that is our topic this morning. you can give us a call and way and -- we are also on line. and you can find us on twitter. the top story and "the washington
someone to it to the citizens' private fund, using organizations like the popular organizations where clients go in and file lawsuits, because they take money and use it for their campaign and basically leave the person that is lucky plan to -- that is the plaintiff in this particular situation penniless, and nobody does anything about it. and those that are members of the local church -- they go from church to church, to help fund the organization. i find that robbing people, legally doing it, and ignoring it when making a complaint -- we have to find where the money comes from and i think we are doing a poor job on that. thank you, and have a great day. guest: i am not sure i totally understand the question, but in terms of disclosure, that is a very important part of the process now, because there is more ability to spend money. i think that a lot of voters would be interested in knowing as much as they can about where the support for a particular candidate is coming from. host: people are looking at the race in minnesota as a real test case of the citizens united decision. guest:
this is not the end of that. a lot more to go. go more years. that does it for us. i'm eric shawn. >>amie: i'm jamie colby. good to have you with us. we'll send you to washington now, much more news with shannon bream. have a great day and good have a great day and good holiday. t99captioned bypclosed c >> shannon: economic push. president obama is ready to unveil the latest plan to fix the economy. does he have the right prescription? and march to the midterm, if the president can help the economy, will it help the democrats face uphill battle in november? stem cell debate. legal ruling stops funding of embryonic stem cell research. ethics versus scientific process? we have a fair and balanced debate on that coming up. i'm shannon bream. live from the nation's capital starts right now. the obama administration seems eager to talk about the economy, but does america like what it's hearing? mr. obama put a spin on weak job numbers and now he is pushing ideas to spur economic growth. julie kirtz is standing by with more on that. >> reporter: he is going to visit two swing states and
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
are now learning that more than 60% of u.s. pipelines are aging, and according to the ntsb putting countless lives at risk. trace gallagher has more live from our west coast newsroom, trace. >> reporter: i've got to tell you, megyn the more we look into this the more concerning this gets, five days after the san bruno pipe explosion and we still have no idea what the exact cause was. the ntsb saying, look around the country. there could be thousands, maybe tens of thousands of pipes that are in the same condition the san bruno pipe was in. remember, if you want to look at these pictures, the san bruno pipes were all put in in the 1950s. this is 1948, look at the hillsides, the area, there are very few subdivisions put in here. they were all put in by the 1950s. now we'll show you almost of the same picture of what it looks like today, you'll get a better example. look at the sprawl. on top of all of those gas lines that were put in 50 years ago, and keep in mind that for a metal pipe 50 years is about the life expectancy, look at the sprawl in the same area. all those pipes that we
, the president of the united states and michele obama. [band plays "hail to the chief" ] let us pray. dear lord, help privilege we are to live in america. we praise you for those who throughout our nation's history of stood between our beloved homes and the desolation of war, pledging their lives to establish and maintain our precious freedom. today, we offer special thanks to the service of one of america's finest chairman, chief master sergeant richard etchberger who on that fateful day in 1964 who demonstrated tremendous valor beyond the call of duty. as the son of this war hero -- receives on his behalf the medal of honor, we know his family will stand a little taller. and so, also, shall we, a very proud and grateful nation. now, as we honor this american hero and the family that loved and supported him, we ask that you graced our time together with your love and blessing, in your holy and wondrous name we pray. amen. >> amen. please be seated. good afternoon. on behalf of michele and myself, welcome to the white house. i think you for your wonderful invocation, a general. among all the mi
with your tea party backed candidates? yes and no are the answers. republicans only. you can also e-mail us or send us a tweet. here is a -- "the washington times" this morning. that is the analysis in a "the washington times." from "roll call." also in "roll call" is an analysis. he says a lot of the candidates can be elected but delaware is different. it christina obama's victory effectively ends the party's chances of winning the senate seat long held by joe biden. that is his analysis. on the front page of "washington times" this morning is this story -- and "usa today" lead editorial -- that is how they see it. in "the new york post" -- the tea party gets wild. again, republicans only. we want to hear if you are happy with your tea party-backed candidates. mark -- mike from spartanburg, south carolina. you say no. go ahead. caller: good morning. those are the fringe folks and they are crazy. they can't win, thank god. but there is no plan for what they are going to do once they get there. they want to destroy education, get rid of social security. these folks are crazy. we can't afford
is really making her presence felt in the state next to us here in texas. twisters touched down in and around the city of dallas. that's where the weather channel's julie martin is joining us from this morning. julie, good morning to you. what's the latest? >> well, good morning, matt. hermine made for a very wild weather day here in texas, from flash flooding to tornadoes. it really left its mark, and unfortunately, it is not finished just yet. i want to take you now to some images from the evening rush hour last night here in dallas, as twisters just started dropping out of the sky, as many as six funnels reported throughout the area. one of them slicing right through the heart of the city, hitting many buildings, bringing up water mains, and also knocking out power to thousands of people. one of the most impressive images, an 18-wheeler literally picked up, flipped 180 degrees with the driver inside, and slammed into the very building i am standing in front of. that driver, by the way, is doing all right this morning. but before all of that widespread flash flooding throughou
that democrats pushed through congress. >> let us transform. i'll tell you what small business owners are saying. >> in the race of the profit margin i raised my sales up 22% per unit. >> tucker carlson in washington, for more than 200 years, politicians have walked through these doors right behind me and promised you the american people that above all they would tell the truth. >> i promise you. >> i promise you.... >> i promise you.... >> i can promise you this. >> but do they? and do they even know when they are lying? >> i remember landing under sniper fire. >> fascinating insides into political minds. >> imagine being locked in a foreign jail and sentenced to 30 years behind bars for a crime you didn't commit? >> i had no idea what was going on. they put a piece of paper in front of me and it said accused of rape and murder and they influence me into a cell. >> i'm here with an american's nightmare that sparked an international incident. crime shows like csi influence what jurors think? >> csi affect is the problem of jurors thinking that real world is resolved in the same way that case on
for the weather. >> cool stuff for us this morning, not quite as cool as yesterday morning, but you will need a light jacket at this hour. the barometric pressure at 31.5. we will start out with sunshine this morning. it should stay dry during the day with a high temperature of 82 degrees later on today. so slightly warmer during the day today than yesterday. when we come back, we will check hurricane igor and the seven-day forecast. for now, to the news desk. >> overnight bp engineers began the final plugging of the leak in the gulf of mexico spill. >> jay gray has the latest from louisiana. >> engineers were set to begin the final pressure test on the deep water well. after pouring cement, scientists want to make sure the seal will hold more than 1,100 pounds of pressure per square inch. crew members are confident it will. in the final hours, there has been a sense of pride. >> the fact that it had done so much damage. it is the fact that we were able to help solve and fix something that so many people wanted and needed fixed. >> sealing the well won't solve the problem so many living on th
. mr. neal: madam speaker, more than 100 years ago the first u.s. mutual fund was started in boston. mutual funds have been a way of life for every man to invest in the market. with the benefits of pooling and diversification. it invites the term mutualization. today more than 50 million households invest through mutual funds with a median household income of $80,000. more than 50% of 401-k assets were invested in mutual funds at the end of 2009. h.r. 4337 was introduced last year by mr. rangel and i to modernize the tax laws regarding to regulate investment companies, better known as mutual funds. a technical explanation and revenue table for this bill may be found on the joint tax website, www.jtc.gov. the tax rules that relate to mutual funds date back to more than half a century. although those rules have been updated from time to time, it's been over 20 years since they were last revisited. the bill before us today would make several changes to the tax code to address outdated provisions such as rules that relates to preferential dividends and rules to mutual funds to send noti
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
thank you all for putting a face to something that many of us really had no idea was happening in america. well, the beauty of all this is that you're not your past. you get to create from now who you want to be. and you can use your past as a way to strengthen who you want to be. so thank you for sharing your stories. and again, i want to say to everybody, if you think something strange is going on, in your house, in your neighborhood, especially when children are involved, you need to tell somebody. listen to that part of yourself that these girls listened to. and don't stop until you feel you've been heard. thank you all for watching. and remember, make your car a no phone zone. you thought i wasn't going to get it in, but i did. bye, everybody. bye, everybody. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] how would i make school a tter place? field trips to the zoo! more basketballs. soccer balls. and a museum! [ growls ] more basketballs. soccer balls! more books. yeah. like just a ton of books. [ g
thing that caused us to do it. just a deep conviction from god that something has to happen. >> reporter: so he is praying. as are so many other people around the world. i'm terry moran in gainesville, florida. >> now more information's starting to come out about this guy. they said apparently he doesn't know any muslims personally and a lot of what he knows about the religion has come from youtube. a lot of question about who this guy is. >> countering extremism with extremism is what a lot of people are saying. it's interesting. in 2005 there was just a report out that some guards at guantanamo bay flushed a koran, and that incited deadly riots in afghanistan. when you later general david petraeus saying this could really hurt our armed men overseas, it is a worry. >>> coming up after the break, the results of a study on memory loss. >> who is osked more, men or women? you're watching "world news now." >>> in a new study that proves what women and myself have really known for years, that men are more forgetful. >> not surprised here. the study from the mayo clinic says as men age they
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)